GE Condenser Emergency Repair

GE Condenser Emergency Repair

GE Condenser Emergency Repair
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Recently a customer was having a significant leak in the hood bellows and needed an on-line fix in order to make it to their scheduled outage for the following month.

Brain-storming with the Oakridge Bellows engineering group a temporary fix was put in place that got them to their outage.

Rolled angle with rope and caulking to seal the gap

The system, operating under a vacuum, will pull down on the rolled angle once the gap is sealed with ceramic rope and high temperature caulk.

The customer was able to maintain a stronger system vacuum than other attempted methods such as stuffing fire-blanket and sealing putty in the cavity.

This repair needs to be done while the system is hot so that there is no significant thermal growth movement; which will break the seal.

How this fix would look on a standard GE hood bellows

The Oakridge Bellows team was able to supply a new condenser seal/ hood bellows assembly in time for the outage.

Oakridge Bellows has the tooling to duplicate the most common OEM condenser seals, such as GE and Westinghouse.*

To avoid steam turbine efficiency losses, add the condenser bellows seal to routine inspection, and change this part out per the OEM recommendations – usually at 25 years.

*Oakridge Bellows is not associated with GE or Westinghouse

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About The Author

Greg Perkins
Greg Perkins
President & General Manager

Greg Perkins has 25 years experience in the expansion joint industry. In his previous employment with Senior Flexonics Pathway, Greg Perkins held the position of CEO and General Manager for 11 years. Prior positions include project engineer, director of engineering, and business unit manager.

In addition Greg, a degreed engineer, served on both the EJMA (expansion joint manufacturers association) technical and management committee tasked with developing/updating bellows and expansion joint performance criteria. Proficient in ASME design codes. Patents include high temperature piping restraint structures for expansion joint applications.

Got questions? Need answers? Call Greg today (830) 626-7773 or send him an email [email protected]!